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Txt, a Description (of sorts).

An accumulative event of mineralogical, metaphysical and metallurgical telling, ‘Lost Rocks (2017–21)’ is a unique library of forty two books composed by forty three contemporary artists from around the world. Part artwork, part curatorial platform and part experiment in publishing as art practice. Increments of absence. This life that is all at once. Love. Grief. Relation.

At the conceptual heart of this ambitious project sits a discarded geological specimen display board, found by A Published Event at the Glenorchy Tip shop in the northern suburbs of nipaluna/Hobart, Tasmania. Land of the muwinina people. Forty of its fifty-six rocks were missing (the forty-first came loose in transit three years later). At once, the rock board is both a decomposing geological taxonomy and a proposition for new mineralogical recomposings of body, duration and event.

This library replaces the missing rocks, not with geological specimens, but ‘fictiōnellas’, from the 19th century term ‘fictioneer’. Commonly defined as a ‘writer or inventor of fiction’, the idea is reinvented here through ‘fictiōneering’ – a process of making-with the events of lived experience. A bringing into language the living experience of the event.

Returning to its Latin root of ‘fictiō’, meaning to make-with rather than to make up, this process of fictiōneering, or making-with, is itself a process of ‘speculative eventing’. Through the fictiōnella, A Published Event takes the printed novella back to its roots as a storytelling process based in lived experience. As the recording of news, the recounting of real-life events, it is a process very much activated in the oral tradition. Critically, the fictiōnella is a gesture of experiential and imperceptible telling.

Since 2016, our missing rocks and the artists they each found along the way have expanded and intruded in ways we might never have imagined—were the lure of absence a less familiar, less curious and less open to invention, thing. With each publishing, the library is distributed through live events, site-specific performances, readings, online gatherings, art book fairs, residencies, fieldwork—and most important of all—collaboration. Get in touch.

Artists, writers etc;

Margaret Woodward is an artist, writer and publisher based in lutruwita/ Tasmania. She is co-founder of duo A Published Event (APE), making long-term relational artworks through shared acts of public telling. Exploring chance encounter, constructed situations and the shared authorship of lived experience, In 2019, Margaret was awarded the Ruth Stephan Fellowship at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University. Woodward’s publications, ‘Crocoite’ and ‘Fall of the Derwent’ were long-listed as finalists in the 2017 Premier’s Literary Awards, Tasmania, Australia. Woodward has a PhD in Design from Curtin University of Technology.

Justy Phillips is an artist, writer and publisher. She is co-founder of duo A Published Event, making long-term relational artworks through shared acts of public telling. Exploring chance encounter, constructed situations and the shared authorship of lived experience, Phillips works with artists and writers, materials and ideas, writing, prose, book-works and performance. In 2019, Justy was awarded the Ruth Stephan Fellowship at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University. She has a PhD from RMIT University, Melbourne.

Jane Rendell (BSc, DipArch, MSc, PhD) is Professor of Critical Spatial Practice at the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, where she co-initiated the MA Situated Practice and supervises MA and PhD projects. Jane has introduced concepts of ‘critical spatial practice’ and ‘site-writing’ through her authored books: The Architecture of Psychoanalysis (2017), Silver (2016), Site-Writing (2010), Art and Architecture (2006), and The Pursuit of Pleasure (2002).

Sarah Jones explores text as the medium through which critical theory performs as the material of practice. She is currently examining the ways in which publishing as artistic practice can be redefined as process-based, through experimental writing practices as they emerge at the juncture of philosophy, art and writing. Sarah holds a PhD from the University of New South Wales and a Masters of Fine Art from the Dutch Art Institute.

Ross Gibson is an artist, writer and Centenary Professor in Creative & Cultural Research at the University of Canberra. Recent works include the books 26 Views of the Starburst World (UWAP) and Stone Grown Cold (Cordite Books) and the co-production of the ABC Radio National Feature ‘Energy Grids’. Outside academia he was inaugural Creative Director at the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (1998 – 2002) and a Senior Consultant Producer for the establishment of the Museum of Sydney (1993–96).

Ben Walter is a Tasmanian author of lyrical fiction, poetry and experimental nature writing whose work has appeared in Lithub, Meanjin, The Best Australian Science Writing, Guardian Australia, The Saturday Paper and a wide range of other periodicals. He has been shortlisted four times in the Tasmanian Premier’s Literary Prizes, and his debut collection of short stories, “What Fear Was”, is forthcoming in 2021 from Puncher and Wattmann. He is the fiction editor at Island.

Ally Bisshop is an artist, writer and researcher, dividing her time between Berlin and Sydney. Her research and process-driven practice combines sculpture, sound, text, film, dialogue and image. Her work is an exploration of materiality as movement: experimenting with intensive variations in organic, geologic and temporal processes, and testing the porous categories of life/nonlife. Ally holds both a Ph.D. and B.F.A from UNSW Art and Design, Sydney, was a student in Olafur Eliasson’s Institut für Räumexperimente at the UDK Berlin.

Greg Lehman is an Indigenous Visiting Research Fellow at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies and has recently completed a PhD at the University of Tasmania’s School of Art on visual representations of Tasmanian Aborigines. Greg is also an Honorary Research Fellow at the Australian National University’s Humanities Research Centre, supporting the development of Encounters exhibition.

James Newitt is an artist who has exhibited his work in exhibitions in museums, galleries and public spaces throughout Australia and Europe. In 2012 he was awarded the prestigious Samstag Scholarship to participate in the Maumaus Independent Study Program in Lisbon where he continues to live and work.

Mary Scott is a visual artist and passionate arts educator and mentor. Her work is cross media and manifests in many contexts and formats. Among her achievements are a Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Contribution to Teaching and Learning, University of Tasmania. Residences include Bath Spa University Research Centre; Project Space, Wimbledon College of Art, and she was Guest Artist, Haystack School of Arts and Crafts, Maine. She lives and works in Hobart, Tasmania.

Therese Keogh is an artist and writer living and working in Narrm/Melbourne, Australia. Her practice operates at intersections between sculpture, geography, and landscape architecture, to produce multilayered projects that explore the socio-political and material conditions of knowledge production. Therese holds an MFA from Sydney College of the Arts, and an MA Geography from Queen Mary University of London. She is currently undertaking a PhD at Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne.

Rory Wray-McCann is an underground miner who has lived on the West Coast of Tasmania for nearly three decades, working and helping to raise and fund a family of three. He got out of ‘the black rabbit game’ a while ago and rebadged himself as a surface tip rat with a creative bent. Rory uses the materials of the Tasmanian landscape, mainly rocks and crystals, as his palette, creating large scale geological compositions set in concrete.

Julie Gough is an artist, writer and curator based in Hobart. Her art/research practice often involves uncovering and re-presenting conflicting and subsumed histories, many referring to her family’s experiences as Tasmanian Aboriginal people. Julie holds a PhD from the University of Tasmania and has exhibited widely in Australia since 1994 including: TENSE PAST, solo survey exhibition, Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, 2019. Her work is held in most Australian state and national gallery collections.

Tine Melzer works as an artist, author and lecturer. Her work connects the philosophy of language with visual means and literature; her main motif is language. She has studied Fine Arts and Philosophy in Amsterdam and received her PhD from the University of Plymouth after undertaking research on Ludwig Wittgenstein & Gertrude Stein. Today she teaches at HKB Bern University of the Arts. Recently published works include Taxidermy for Language-Animals (Rollo Press, Zürich 2020) and Ludwig & Gertrude (With Egon Stemle, edition taberna kritika, Bern 2021).

Tine Melzer works as an artist, author and lecturer. Her work connects the philosophy of language with visual means and literature; her main motif is language. She has studied Fine Arts and Philosophy in Amsterdam and received her PhD from the University of Plymouth after undertaking research on Ludwig Wittgenstein & Gertrude Stein. Today she teaches at HKB Bern University of the Arts. Recently published works include Taxidermy for Language-Animals (Rollo Press, Zürich 2020) and Ludwig & Gertrude (With Egon Stemle, edition taberna kritika, Bern 2021).

Raymond Arnold is an Australian printmaker whose work reflects the construction of the Tasmania landscape, in particular that of the west coast, his adopted home. Raymond has held more than 50 solo exhibitions and participated in group shows in Australia, Europe and the USA. In 2006, Raymond established Landscape Art Research Queenstown (LARQ) with a dream to develop a wilderness art space as a ‘nest’ for incubation and a supporter of artists’ in residence.

Jerry de Gryse is a landscape architect and co-founder and director of Inspiring Place. Jerry has practice experience that ranges in scale from square metres to thousands of square kilometres and in setting from the city centre to the wilderness. Jerry believes that exceptional public spaces are created where the needs of people for a vibrant setting are integrated with a community’s vision for its place and environmental sustainability principles. Jerry is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects.

Trygve Luktvasslimo is an artist whose work examines seduction, worship and redemption in music and in visual and verbal narratives. Through a diverse practice he locates spiritual projects outside of the religious field, and he looks at how these faith-based concepts influence the construction of characters and stories. He exhibits and performs internationally in galleries, museums, festivals and clubs. Trygve holds an MFA in Visual Art from Malmö Art Academy, Sweden (2006). He is a board member, Arts Council Norway and a public art consultant KORO, Norway Office for public Art.

Lucy Bleach is an artist whose practice focuses on human’s enduring relationships to volatile environments, seeking engagement with communities that authentically experience such relationships, and researchers who monitor the earth’s movement. She works across sculptural objects, architectural forms and geo-acoustics to create artworks where processes, forms and actions are informed by geologic force, and the ensuing instability and transformation. She has exhibited nationally and internationally, and undertaken research projects in geologically unstable regions around the world.

Wendy Morrow is a dancer, teacher and collaborator who grew up within a family of dancers, trained at the Australian Ballet School in the early 70s before pursuing a career as a professional dancer in Australia and overseas. She has performed with the Monte Carlo Ballet, The Scottish Ballet, The Sydney Dance Company and Danceworks and as an independent artist she has been at the vanguard of integrating dance with other forms for most of her career. Her work is deeply rooted in the kinaesthetic and the presence of the imaginative body.

Ruth Hadlow has a process-based art practice which includes installation work, writing, performative lectures and artist’s books. Ruth has a PhD from the University of South Australia and works as a freelance educator focused on creative research & process-based contemporary arts practice. She co-runs salon, a platform supporting the development of experimental and intimate new work and ideas, and SalonWriting, which publishes writing by visual artists.

Jo Paterson Kinniburgh is a spatial designer. She is a Wugulora First Nations descendant of the formerly enslaved Karyouacou West African peoples, whose position is that architecture is a device for spatially enacting erasure. Jo is a lecturer in the School of Architecture at UTS; a doctoral candidate in the UTS Centre for the Advancement of Indigenous Knowledges; and a director at Bangawarra, a design partnership with D’harawal Knowledge Keeper Shannon Foster.

Louisa King is an artist. Her practice is one of site responsive landscape experimentation, carried out through installation, drawing and performative writing. Louisa’s practice explores the dialectic potential of landscape architectural practice in accessing the nature/culture collapse. Her interest lies in cartography, ficto-criticism, and temporary event based landscape design and material explorations of the geologic city. Louisa is a lecturer in landscape architecture at University Technology Sydney and PhD candidate at RMIT University, Melbourne.

Shevaun Cooley is a Western Australian poet, essayist, and climber. Her poetry has been published in Cordite, Island, Poetry Wales, Meanjin, Southerly, The Best Australian Poems (2009, 2017), and she has been shortlisted for both the Newcastle Poetry Prize, and the University of Canberra Vice-Chancellor’s International Poetry Prize. Her debut collection of poems, Homing was released in 2017 by Giramondo Publishing.

Perdita Phillips is an Australian artist/researcher primarily interested in the environment and the relationships between humans and nonhuman others (rocks, plants, animals, ecosystem processes). She has published Invisible Monsters (2018), A simple rain (Vivienne Glance and Perdita Phillips 2012) and birdlife (2011) with Lethologica Press. Recent exhibitions include Listening in the Anthropocene (2020 Charles Sturt University) Make Known: The Exquisite Order of Infinite Variation (2018 UNSW Galleries) and Incinerator Art Award (2017 Incinerator Gallery).

Tricky Walsh works both collaboratively and in a solo capacity. Their projects focus on both spatial and communication concerns and while they use a diversity of media (architecture, painting, drawing, sculpture, installation, sound, film, comics, radio) it is foremost the concept at hand that determines which form of material experimentation occurs within these broader themes. They have exhibited extensively throughout Tasmania, Australia and Internationally.

Lyndal Jones is a Melbourne-based visual artist who employs performance, dance and video installation. Jones’ work focuses on the politics of context, place and gender through very long-term projects, including The Avoca Project (2005-19) with Watford House. She has exhibited extensively in both solo and group shows in Australia and overseas. (In 2001, Jones represented Australia at the Venice Biennale). She holds a PhD from RMIT University where she was Professor of Contemporary Art (2010-16).

Bianca Hester is an artist and writer who currently lives in Wollongong, on unceded Dharawal land. Her research engages with the fabric of urban space, where place is approached as a complex constellation of human timescales, nonhuman durations, atmospheric forces, objects, histories and geologic materialities. Bianca completed PhD at RMIT (Melbourne, 2007) and is a continuing member of the Open Spatial Workshop (with Terri Bird and Scott Mitchell). She is currently co-director of Research and Enterprise in the school of Art and Design at UNSW Sydney.

Catherine Evans is a Berlin-based Australian artist who works across photography, sculpture and installation. Her work focuses on geologic time and where this intersects with our own human timescales: as found in our bodies, their materiality and our lived-histories through colonialism and archaeology. She was recipient of a VCA Graduate Mentorship (2013) and Georges Mora Fellowship (2017). She has exhibited widely, most recently her work “Standing Stone” won first prize in the 2020 Neuköllner Kunstpreis, Berlin.

Caroline Loewen is curator at the Lougheed House, a historic house museum in Calgary, Canada. She holds a Master’s degree in Art History from the University of St. Andrews, as well as a BA in Archaeology and a BA in Art History from the University of Calgary. Her degrees in both Art History and Archaeology support her interests in art, history, and land; her curatorial practice focuses on exploring ideas around cultural geography, place-making, memory, and cultural/natural landscapes.

Helena Demczuk is a painter based in Queenstown on the west coast of Tasmania. The daughter of Ukrainian migrants, Helena lived in Papua and New Guinea before enrolling at QIT, Brisbane and Monash University, Melbourne to study Ukrainian language and literature. In 2005 Helena completed a BFA at the University of Tasmania, School of Art which included a semester at the Glasgow School of Art. Her artwork focuses on people, landscapes and the colour that unites them.

Nancy Kuhl is a poet and Curator of Poetry for the Yale Collection of American Literature at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University. She is author of full-length poetry collections including Suspend (2010) and Pine to Sound (2015), as well as the chapbooks In the Arbor (1997), winner of the Wick Poetry Chapbook Prize, Little Winter Theater (2011), and The Birds of the Year (2016). Kuhl is co-editor, with Richard Deming, of Phylum Press, publisher of poetry pamphlets and chapbooks.

Robin Banks has a passion for geology and the printed page. In her professional career, Robin has been involved in a broad range of human rights advocacy activities and has a strong background in disability rights in particular. In 2000 she was admitted to practice as a Barrister and Solicitor in the Supreme Court of NSW and the High Court of Australia. And in 2010 was appointed Tasmania’s Anti-Discrimination Commissioner. Robin is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Tasmania.

Erica Van Horn is an American artist and writer. An early solo exhibition I’ve Been Making Books Since the Day President Kennedy Was Shot (1986) at Franklin Furnace, NYC, gathered together a selection of her Artist Books. Her work has increasingly evolved to a primary form of narrative writing. Recent publications include Living Locally (2014), Em & Me (2018), Too Raucous For A Chorus (2018), Nous avons assez de pluie eu (2020) and By Bus (2021). Based in rural Ireland, she works together with Simon Cutts on the publications and projects of Coracle.

Ilana Halperin, born in New York, is an artist based between Glasgow and the Isle of Bute. Her work explores the relationship between geology and daily life. She combines fieldwork in diverse locations – on volcanoes in Hawaii, caves in France, geothermal springs in Japan with an active studio-based practice. Her work has featured in solo exhibitions worldwide including Berliner Medizinhistorisches Museum der Charité and Artists Space, New York. She was the Inaugural Artist Fellow at National Museums Scotland. Ilana Halperin: Felt Events is forthcoming from Strange Attractor/MIT Press.

Jen Bervin is a poet and visual artist. Her multidisciplinary, research-driven practice activates the intersections of text and textiles, art, poetry, and scholarship, science, technology, and craft, and has been widely recognized, collected, and exhibited internationally. Bervin has received fellowships from Creative Capital, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, New York Foundation for the Arts, MacDowell Colony, Center for Book Arts, and Camargo Foundation in France.

Loren Kronemyer is an artist living and working in remote lutruwita (Tasmania), Australia. Her works span interactive and live performance, experimental media art, and large-scale worldbuilding projects aimed at exploring ecological futures and survival skills. As part of duo Pony Express, she collaborates frequently with laboratories, including most recently as the first resident at the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research. She is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Tasmania.

Chris Henschke is an artist who works across analogue and digital media and experimental physics and chemistry. He has exhibited internationally, including the National Gallery of Australia, 2004; the Natural History Museum in Vienna, 2016; and Dark Mofo, Hobart, 2019; and has undertaken various residencies including the Australian Synchrotron, 2007 and 2010, and the ANAT Synapse program at the CSIRO, 2018. He has a PhD which included practice at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN), Switzerland, 2013-2017.

Sofie Burgoyne is an artist currently working between Australia, Portugal and the UK. Making and performing artistic work related to the body, in a range of different contexts, her artistic practice is interested in alternative ways of relating mind to body, reality to the imagined and self to other. Inherent in her outlook of making is reflection and critique of the place of performance in theatres and consideration of the relevance and social function of art itself. As a maker and performer Sofie works across independent and company environments, collaborating with theatre makers, sound producers, visual artists, dancers and choreographers. Recently Sofie has collaborated with Miguel Pereira (O Rumo Do Fumo, PT), Theo Clinkard (UK) and Frantic Assembly (UK) and her work has been presented by The Place (UK) and Movement Research at Judson Church (US).

Katie Stackhouse is an Australian artist living and working in Naarm/Melbourne. Examining notions of time within landscape, contemporary human interactions with natural environments and emerging experiential technologies, her sculptural, spatial and performance-based practice is informed by scientific and philosophical views of ecology. After completing a Bachelor of Fine Arts, Stackhouse studied at the Gerrit Rietveld Art Academy in the Netherlands. Stackhouse is currently completing a Master of Contemporary Art at the Victorian College of the Arts and has been a resident at the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in the USA, the Amsterdams Grafisch Atelier in the Netherlands and Durrmu Arts Centre in Peppimenarti, Australia. Her work is included in private collections throughout Australia, Europe, Japan and the USA.

Polly Stanton is an artist and filmmaker who currently lives and works
in Narrm/Melbourne, Australia. Her work primarily investigates the relationships between environment, human actions and land use. Her films and installations focus on contested sites and extractive zones, presenting landscape as a politically charged field of negotiation, entangled with history, technology and capital. Recent exhibitions include; Indefinite Terrains. Metro Arts, Brisbane, Australia (solo) and Shelter in Place. Town Hall Gallery, Melbourne, Australia; Notions of Care. Bus Projects, Melbourne, Australia; and Her Beauty and Her Terror. Caboolture Regional Art Gallery, QLD, Australia. Stanton was awarded a Doctor of Philosophy (Fine Art), RMIT University in 2018.

Siddharth Pandey is a Research Fellow in Global History at the Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany. Pandey’s research straddles English literature, cultural studies, global history, heritage conservation, visual arts, materiality studies and geohumanities. Hailing from the Himalayas of Shimla in North India, he completed his Bachelors (H), Masters (MA) and MPhil in English Literature from the University of Delhi (India), after which he joined the University of Cambridge for a second MPhil in Children’s Literature from 2012-13. He recently completed his PhD (2019) at Cambridge, that studied the ways in which ‘making’ in its myriad forms (like human craftsmanship and non-human growth) impacts the genesis of ‘wonder’ in secondary worlds of fantasy literature. In 2019 Pandey was a Visiting Scholar at Yale University’s Centre for British Art.

Dominique Chen lives and works in South East Queensland, Australia. She is a proud biridja gamilaroi woman and is passionate about communicating ideas of culture, place and environment through her work. She currently lectures at Griffith University (Queensland College of Art) in the areas of Aboriginal art, culture and socio-political histories. Dominique is also part of momo doto, an ongoing collaboration with Sydney-based artist Tom Blake. She is currently undertaking doctoral study at the University of Technology Sydney, exploring the intersections between relational art, actvism and urban Aboriginal agriculture.

Tom Blake is an artist whose solo and collaborative practice draws on fragmented moments, looped imagery and recurring motifs as potential sites for contemplating the psychological, architectural and technological frameworks that surround us. Tom has exhibited in Australia, Japan and Italy and has been a finalist in Fremantle Arts Centre Print Award, The Blake Prize, the Fisher’s Ghost Art Award, the CLIP Award and has previously been awarded a Clitheroe Foundation Mentorship. Tom is also part of momo doto, an ongoing collaboration with Brisbane-based artist Dominique Chen.

A Published Event (collaborative duo, Justy Phillips and Margaret Woodward) make long-term relational artworks through shared acts of public telling. Exploring chance encounter, constructed situations and the shared authorship of lived experience, they work with materials and ideas, language, installation and performance. A.P.E’s hybrid works explore the metaphysical language and speculative publishing of lived experience. Together we co-compose complex fields of social, cultural and political relations.

Events, Exhibits, readings etc;

2021 
Rocks (Lost). Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward/ A Published Event. Commissioned essay for StoneStatements Editions 2021, an artwork by Mabe Bethônico for the Biennale Architecttura 2019, Venice.
Granite. Red Sandstone. Bauxite. Fossil. Fossil. Library of Holes / Lost Rocks (2017–21) seam X launch. Artists; Katie Stackhouse, Sofie Burgoyne, Dominique Chen and Tom Blake, Siddharth Pandey, Polly Stanton and Chris Henschke. Site-specific installation and virtual conversation series. lutruwita/Tasmania. (tbc) October.
NGV Melbourne Art Book Fair 2021 Exhibitor. Virtual/ online event. March.
Lost Rocks (2017–21) Field Library, Justy Phillips. Radio interview with Paul McIntyre, ABC Hobart. 26 February.
Printed Matter’s Virtual Art Book Fair 2021. Exhibitor. Virtual/ online event. 24–28 February.
Silver. Granite. Copper. Fossil. Fossil. Fossil. Lost Rocks (2017–21) seam IX launch. Artists; Jen Bervin, Nancy Kuhl, Loren Kronemyer, Ilana Halperin, Robin Banks, Erica Van Horn. Various online events. Printed Matter Virtual Art Book Fair. Online, the world. 24–28 February.
Small Press Zine Fair in partnership with Mona Foma. Exhibitor. Hobart. February.
Copper by Catherine Evans. Review by An Paenhuysen. January.
Revisiting the LBK Wells. Therese Keogh, Solo exhibition, State Museum of Archaeology Chemnitz (smac), Saxony, Germany.
2020 
Arctic Art Book Fair 2020. Represented. Virtual/ online event .
Copper. Red Sandstone. Granite. Artists Catherine Evans, Caroline Loewen and Helena Demczuk in conversation with Margaret Woodward. Lost Rocks (2017–21) seam VIII launch, Listening in the Anthropocene, symposium and online exhibition hosted by Charles Sturt University. Online conversation and readings. 27 August.
Listening in the Anthropocene. Multiple artists. Symposium and online exhibition hosted by Charles Sturt University. Lost Rocks (2017–21), volumes I – 29. Online exhibition. Ongoing.
Mineralogical Telling. Margaret Woodward. Keynote presentation for Listening in the Anthropocene symposium and online exhibition hosted by Charles Sturt University, 28 August.
Stalactite. Sandstone. Granite. Artists; Tricky Walsh, Bianca Hester and Lyndal Jones in conversation with architect Laura Harper. Lost Rocks (2017–21) Seam VII launch. Online event hosted by A Published Event and Negative Press. March 21.
Sandstone. A Published Event X Negative Press X Bianca Hester. Limited edition offset poster.
NGV Melbourne Art Book Fair 2020. A Published Event. Exhibitor. National Gallery of Victoria. 13–15 March.
Geographies of Gold. A Published Event in conversation with Laura Harper. Presented by Monash Architecture Urban Lab and the Atlas of the Underground Project. ANZ Gothic Bank, Melbourne. 16 March. (Cancelled).
2019
Boston Art Book Fair. Exhibitor. Boston, USA. 8–10 November.
Maggot and Crow. Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward/ A Published Event. Commissioned essay for Writers at Work Series, Sydney Review of Books, November.
Fossil. Marble. Granite. Artists; Louisa King and Jo Paterson Kinniburgh, Shevaun Cooley and Perdita Phillips, for Lost Rocks (2017–21) Seam VI Launch . Boston Art Book Fair, Boston, USA. 8–10 Novembe.
Fossil. Marble. Granite. Artists; Louisa King and Jo Paterson Kinniburgh, Shevaun Cooley and Perdita Phillips, for Lost Rocks (2017–21) Seam VI. Open studio. Studio 102, Josef + Anni Albers Foundation, Bethany, USA. 24 October.
Erratic Ecologies: A Field Guide. Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward. Visiting Scholars Seminar, Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University. 21 October.
Ruth Stephan Fellowship. A Published Event. Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University. September/October.
Artists in Residence. A Published Event. Josef & Anni Albers Foundation, Bethany, CT. September/October.
Granite II and Fossil II. Shevaun Cooley and Wendy Morrow. Featured in New Acquisitions: December, National Poetry Library, UK.
Mudstone. Trygve Luktvasslimo. A conversation with the artist and Lofoten International Art Festival director Svein Pedersen, Oslo, Norway. August 20.
Mudstone. Trygve Luktvasslimo. Artist’s film developed from the fictiōnella, Mudstone (2019), Lofoten International Art Festival 2019.
Basalt X Jack’s Reloaded: Material as Memory. Ross Gibson. Symposium speaker. Melbourne. March 23.
Rhyolite. Mudstone. Fossil. Granite. Lost Rocks (2017–21) Seam V launch. Live dance performance and artist’s talk by Wendy Morrow. Melbourne Art Book Fair 2019, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. 16 March.
Rhyolite. Mudstone. Fossil. Granite; Fossil. Wendy Morrow. Live dance performance of Fossil for Lost Rocks (2017–21) Seam V launch. Artists; Lucy Bleach, Wendy Morrow, Trygve Luktvasslimo and Ruth Hadlow. Victoria Gunpowder Magazine, Queens Domain, Hobart. 8 March.
Essays in Vibrational Poetics. Fayen d’Evie. Mixed media installation, The National 2019: New Australian Art, Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney.
Essays in Vibrational Poetics. Margaret Woodward. Artist Text for Fayen d’Evie, Essays in Vibrational Poetics (2019). Catalogue essay in The National 2019: New Australian Art, Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney.
Fossil. James Newitt. Film developed from Fossil (2018), The National 2019: New Australian Art, Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney, 2019. Newitt. James. Fossil (2019), awarded Best Experimental Film, Oslo Independent Film Festival, Norway.
Artists in Residence. A Published Event. The Unconformity. Queenstown. May.
Elsewhere World. Raymond Arnold. Copper, extract published in limited edition artist’s book, coinciding with Elsewhere World, Burnie Regional Art Gallery, Tasmania.
MAC Moves Festival August 2018. Link. Wendy Morrow. Fossil dance performance#1 video.
Imaged in Absence. Therese Keogh. Solo exhibition, Firstdraft, Sydney, Australia.
Imaged in Absence. Therese Keogh. Video installation as part of Jack’s Reloaded: Material as Memory, Melbourne Design Week, Maribyrnong, Australia.

2018 
Libraries of Stone and Wood. A Published Event. Quarterly Essay, Garland Magazine No. 11.
Copper. Copper. Lead Sulphide. Mudstone. Shale. Artists: Raymond Arnold, Jerry de Gryse, Julie Gough, Tine Melzer & Markus Kummer and Rory Wray-McCann, for Lost Rocks (2017–21) seam IV launch. Performance, readings, guided walks. The Unconformity, Queenstown. 19–21 October.
Petrified Wood. Fossil. Petrified Wood. Artists: Mary Scott, Therese Keogh, James Newitt and A Published Event. Lost Rocks (2017–21) Seam III launch. Site-specific installations, Rosny Barn, Tasmania. September.
Silver/Lead. Sarah Jones. Performance reading for undergraduate Critical Practice unit devised by Phillips & Woodward, University of Tasmania, September.
The Habitat of Time. Curated by Dr. Julie Louise Bacon. Exhibiting Lost Rocks (2017–21) #1–12. Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre, NSW, Australia. 19 April–5 May.
Lithic Poetry and Huldefolk 102 (Iceland/USA). Community reading event and film screening, for Petrified Wood. Fossil. Petrified Wood. Rosny Barn, Tasmania. March.
Petrified Wood. Fossil. Petrified Wood. Mary Scott and Therese Keogh. Artists’ Talks. Rosny Barn, Tasmania. March.
Geology Walk & Talk with Ralph Bottrill, Chief Geologist, and Mike Parsons, geologist, Mineral Resources Tasmania. For Petrified Wood. Fossil. Petrified Wood, Rosny Barn, Tasmania. March.
Lost Rocks (2017–21). Curriculum content for Site-Writing unit by Professor Jane Rendell, Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, London.
Marble. Ally Bisshop. It Matters What Moves; PhD Examination Exhibition, AD Space, UNSW Art & Design, Sydney.
Petrified Wood. Mary Scott. Public talk with Margaret Woodward, Great Hall, Melbourne Art Book Fair 2018, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.
Lead Sulphide/ Bleisulfid. Tine Melzer & Markus Kummer. Book launch and performance reading, Archiv / UC Books, Zurich. July 6.
Bleisulfid. Tine Melzer & Markus Kummer. Special German edition. Published by A Published Event.
2017 
Crocoite. Crocoite. Silver. Silver/Lead. Lost Rocks (2017–21) launch event with live performance reading of Silver/Lead by Sarah Jones. Peacock Theatre, Hobart, Australia.
Crocoite. Crocoite. Silver. Silver/Lead. Artists: Sarah Jones, Justy Phillips, Jane Rendell and Margaret Woodward for Sites of Love & Neglect, 10 Days on the Island 2017. Video, audio, print and performance. Site-specific installations; Engine Room, World Class Mineral Display Room; Courthouse and Underground Mine Simulation Room, West Coast Heritage Museum, Zeehan, Tasmania.
Conglomerate. Basalt. Marble. Crystal Bone. Artists: Ben Walter, Ross Gibson, Ally Bisshop and Greg Lehman for Lost Rocks (2017–21) Seam II launch. Live reading event at Etties Piano Bar, Hobart, Australia.
Geologic Time. Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward. Artists in Residence, Banff Centre for Arts & Creativity, Canada. Faculty: Max Andrews and Mariana Capana Luna/Lattitudes, Barcelona) and Sean Lynch (Ireland).
Lost Rocks (2017–21) Seam I & II. Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward. Geologic Time, group exhibition, Banff International Curatorial Institute Residency, Canada. Sep 11–Oct 06.
Marble. Ally Bisshop. Book launch, Walter König bookstore, Hamburger Bahnhof, part of Olafur Eliasson’s Festival of Future Nows. September 14—17.
Lost Rocks (2017–21 ). Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward. Public talk and reading. On Art Writing and Art and Writing, SHOTGUN 6 Public Program, Contemporary Art Tasmania. April 21.
Lost Rocks (2017–21 ). Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward. Keynote presentation and public reading, Creative Resistance Symposium, Situated Writing Practice, The Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London. July 4.
Lost Rocks (2017–21 ). Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward. Public presentation for Experimental Histories II symposium, Uncanny Objects in the Anthropocene, University of Tasmania, Hobart. June 5–6.
Lost Rocks (2017–21). Visual Art Review. The Mercury (Andrew Harper). March 4.
Lost Rocks (2017–21). Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward. ABC Radio Hobart, media interview with Ryk Goddard. February 23.
Marble. Ally Bisshop. Radio interview, Berlin. May 23, 2017 Link
2016 
Crocoite I and II. Justy Phillips & Margaret Woodward. Public Reading, Art Forum, University of Tasmania, Hobart (October 7).

Collections, Prizes, Fairs etc;

USA
Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University.
W. Van Alan Clark, Jr. Library, Tufts University School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
Canada
Paul H. Fleck Memorial Library, Banff Centre for Arts & Creativity.
UK
The National Poetry Library, London.
Winchester School of Art Library.
Australia
Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart.
National Library of Australia.
State Library of Victoria, History of the Book Collection, Melbourne.
State Library of Tasmania, Tasmania Collection, Hobart.
The Unconformity, Tasmania.

Special distributions
Art Collector , #92 APR–JUN 2020. Collaboration X APE, featuring Subscriber edition of Stalactite by Tricky Walsh.
Prizes
2019 
Conglomerate by Ben Walter, (A Published Event). Shortlisted for the Margaret Scott Prize, Premier’s Literary Prizes 2019, Tasmania.
2017 
Crocoite by Margaret Woodward, (A Published Event). Longlisted for the Margaret Scott Prize, Premier’s Literary Prizes 2019, Tasmania.
Art Book Fairs
2021
26–28 March Melbourne Art Book Fair. Online. The world.
24–28 February Printed Matter Virtual Art Book Fair. Online. The world.
23 January Small Press Zine Fair in partnership with Mona Foma, Hobart.

2020
13–15 November Arctic Art Book Fair, Tromsø, Norway.
12–15 March Melbourne Art Book Fair. National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.
2019
8–10 November Boston Art Book Fair. Boston Center for the Arts Cyclorama, USA.
15–16 November Small Publishers Fair. Conway Hall, London, UK.
15–17 March Melbourne Art Book Fair. National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.
21–23 September Hob/Art Book Fair, Long Gallery, Salamanca Arts Centre, Hobart.
2018
15–18 March Melbourne Art Book Fair. National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.
2017
13–15 October Volume Another Art Book Fair, Artspace, Sydney.

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Documentation of a constructed event. Artist Margaret Woodward with 'ROCKS', Zeehan slag heaps, West Coast, lutruwita/ Tasmania. For Lost Rocks (2017–21).
Artist Raymond Arnold with ROCKS at LARQ, Queenstown. On the occasion of 'Copper. Copper. Mudstone. Lead Sulphide. Shale.' for Lost Rocks (2017–21). Presented at the Unconfomrity, Queenstown, 2018.
'Crocoite' by Justy Phillips for 'Crocoite. Crocoite. Silver. Silver/Lead' curated by Jane Deeth for Ten Days on the Island 2017. Engine Room. West Coast Heritage Centre, Zeehan. lutruwita/Tasmania.
'Copper Plate XI, Tallus Scree and Colluvial Deposits'. Etching by artist Raymond Arnold. From 'Elsewhere World', 29.5 x 20cm. As published in Raymond's fictiōnella 'Copper' (2018) for Lost Rocks (2017–21). A Published Event.
'Teaching notes for a ballet class (front and back) by Bruce Morrow. Aluminium tablet. 114 x 85mm. From 'Fossil' (2019) by Wendy Morrow. Lost Rocks (2017–21). APE.
Descending Mt Owen into Queenstown, lutruwita/Tasmania.
Open cut rock face (detail) near the 'Iron Blow', Queenstown, Tasmania.
Documentation of a constructed event. ROCKS on Zeehan slag heaps. West Coast, Tasmania. 2016.
Lost Rocks (2017–21) Seam I–V. Photographed by Peter Whyte.
Copper (2020) by artist Catherine Evans. Image © Catherine Evans 2021. Reproduction by permission only.
'Fossil' (2019) by James Newitt. Video. Installation image. The National: New Australian Art, AGNSW, Sydney, Australia.
'SIlver: A Courtroom Drama' by Jane Rendell for 'Crocoite. Crocoite. Silver. Silver/Lead' curated by Jane Deeth for Ten Days on the Island 2017. West Coast Heritage Centre, Zeehan. lutruwita/Tasmania.
The Great Hall, Melbourne Art Book Fair 2018, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.
'Silver' by Jen Bervin
Entrance to a crocoite mine on private land near Dundas, West Coast, Tasmania.
Open cut rock face (detail) near the 'Iron Blow', Queenstown, Tasmania.
Lost Rocks (2017-21) Seam VI, 2019. Documented by Peter Whyte, Hobart.
Illustration by Artist Ally Bisshop as published on page two of her Lost Rocks (2017–21) fictiōnella 'Marble' (2017).
Copper (2020) by artist Catherine Evans. Image © Catherine Evans 2021. Reproduction by permission only.
Lost Rocks (2017-21) fictiōnellas #1-21. Featuring 'Stalactite' by Tricky Walsh. Twenty one editions plus stichtite serpentine rock ledge. Documented by Peter Whyte, Hobart.
Image from 'Stalactite' by Tricky Walsh
Fieldwork image of the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University. 2019.
Copper (2020) by artist Catherine Evans. Image © Catherine Evans 2021. Reproduction by permission only.
Artist Margaret Woodward with erratic boulders, near Queenstown, West Coast, lutruwita/Tasmania. 2019.
‘Crocoite’ by Margaret Woodward longlisted for The Margaret Scott Prize, Premier's Literary Prizes 2017
Artwork (detail) by Queenstown-based sculptor, prospector and author of Mudstone (2019), Rory Wray McCann
Video still from 'Petrified Wood' by Therese Keogh for the exhibition 'Petrified Wood. Petrified Wood. Fossil.', Rosny Barn, Tasmania. 2018
World Class Mineral Galleries, West Coast Heritage Museum, Zeehan, Tasmania.
Lost Rocks (2017-21) fictiōnellas #1-21. Documented by Peter Whyte, Hobart.
Zinc Ores specimen that worked its way loose from the ROCKS board on its travels over Bass Strait. The board had been exhibited at the Melbourne Art Book Fair 2020. This is the only rock specimen lost to the board since being in our care.
Fine mineral collection (detail of Quartz, Dolomite, Fluorite) at the West Coast Heritage Centre (formerly the Zeehan School of Mines and Metallurgy), Zeehan, West Coast, Tasmania.
'Lost Rocks (2017–21) Deluxe Edition Field Library'. A Published Event. 2021. Edition of 12. Designed and made by Linda Fredheim, lutruwita/Tasmania.
Lost Rocks (2017–21) Seam I–III. Installation view. Petrified Wood. Petrified Wood. Fossil. Rosny Barn. 2018.
Open cut rock face (detail) near the 'Iron Blow', Queenstown, Tasmania.
'Crocoite' by Margaret Woodward for 'Crocoite. Crocoite. Silver. Silver/Lead' curated by Jane Deeth for Ten Days on the Island 2017. West Coast Heritage Museum, Zeehan. lutruwita/Tasmania.
'Geologic Time' Artists in Residence search for edicarian fossils in the Burgess Shale. Banff Centre for the Arts & Creativity, Canada. Faculty, Max Andrews and Mariana Canepa Luna/ Latitudes Curatorial Office, Barcelona.
'SIlver: A Courtroom Drama' by Jane Rendell for 'Crocoite. Crocoite. Silver. Silver/Lead' curated by Jane Deeth for Ten Days on the Island 2017. West Coast Heritage Centre, Zeehan. lutruwita/Tasmania.
Suminagashi collage by Artist Ally Bisshop as published on page eighty-two of her Lost Rocks (2017–21) fictiōnella 'Marble' (2017).
Exhibitor, Melbourne Art Book Fair 2018, The Great Hall, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.
Cut and polished cross section of stichtite serpentine, Dundas, Tasmania
Rocks (Lost) by A Published Event, in Mabe Bethonico's 'Missing Words for Considering Stones, Rocks, Pebbles and Mountains: A Vocabulary of Proximity'. StoneStatements Editions in collaboration with ESAAA éditions. Published as part of the Venice Architecture Biennale 2021.
Fine mineral collection (detail) at the West Coast Heritage Centre (formerly the Zeehan School of Mines and Metallurgy), Zeehan, West Coast, Tasmania.
'Bleisulfid' by Tine Melzer & Markus Kummer, photographed at the 'iron Blow' near Queenstown, Tasmania
An edicarian fossil in the hand during 'Geologic Time' fieldtrip in the Burgess Shale. Banff Centre for the Arts & Creativity, Canada. Faculty, Max Andrews and Mariana Canepa Luna/ Latitudes Curatorial Office, Barcelona.
Lost Rocks (2017–21) special edition tote bag (detail) created on the ocassion of the Melbourne Art Book Fair 2019.
Spectacular crocoite seam in the bowels of a private mine, Dundas, West Coast, Tasmania.
Margaret Woodward, author of Crocoite (2017), emerges from a mine adit at Dundas having seen a spectacular seam of crocite deep within the mine.
Documentation of a constructed event. ROCKS in cutting grass near Queenstown. Tasmania. 2016.
'Geologic Time' Artists in Residence search for edicarian fossils in the Burgess Shale. Banff Centre for the Arts & Creativity, Canada. Faculty, Max Andrews and Mariana Canepa Luna/ Latitudes Curatorial Office, Barcelona.
'Conglomerate' by Ben Walter longlisted for The Margaret Scott Prize, The Premier's Literary Prizes 2019
Exhibitor table at the Melbourne Art Book Fair 2018. National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia.
Stomach of Nucula Glendonensis. Original images from Dana, James Dwight, 1849. Geology with a folio atlas of twenty-one plates. v.10 Geology [Text] (1849), New York: G. Putnam; London: Putnam’s American Agency. Published in 'Marble' (2019) by Louisa King & Jo Paterson Kinniburgh.
View of Mt Owen from Queenstown, Tasmania.
'Lead sulphide' and 'Bleisulfid' (German language edition) by Tine Melzer & Markus Kummer, Queenstown, Tasmania
Dance artist and author of Fossil (2019) with special edition Lost Rocks (2017–21) tote bag created on the ocassion of the Melbourne Art Book Fair 2019.
Members of the public (plus more than one of Raymond and Helena's whippets), joining artist Raymond Arnold, author of Copper (2019) for his guided walk 'Copper' for The Unconformity festival, Queenstown. 2019.
Lost Rocks (2017-21) fictiōnellas #1-21. Documented by Peter Whyte, Hobart.
Lithified coral washed up on Leighton Beach after a storm. 68m. As published in 'Fossil' (2019) by Perdita Phillips.
Lost Rocks Seam VII, 'Fossil' by Perdita Phillips, 'Granite' by Shevaun Cooley and 'Marble' by Louisa King & Jo Paterson Kinniburgh
GSWA 46665 F46287 Lake Thetis Microbialite, Cervantes Lat 30°31’5 Long 115°05’E. Lake Thetis. As published in 'Fossil' (2019) by Perdita Phillips.
Documentation of a found event. Artist Justy Phillips with erratic boulder, CT, United States.
Documentation of a constructed event. Stony Creek Quarry, Branford, CT.
'Silver/Lead' (2017) by Sarah Jones. Performance reading, Peacock Theatre, Salamanca Arts centre, nipaluna/Hobart. Project launch, Lost Rocks (2017–21). A Published Event.
Rubbing made from the joints between two sandstone blocks in a wall of the Queen Victoria Building, George Street, Sydney. Graphite and cartridge paper. August 2019. As published on p16 of Bianca Hester's 'Sandstone' (2020). Lost Rocks (2017–21).
'Crocoite' by Margaret Woodward for 'Crocoite. Crocoite. Silver. Silver/Lead' curated by Jane Deeth for Ten Days on the Island 2017. World Class Mineral Galleries. West Coast Heritage Centre, Zeehan. lutruwita/Tasmania.
An edicarian fossil in the hand during 'Geologic Time' fieldtrip in the Burgess Shale. Banff Centre for the Arts & Creativity, Canada. Faculty, Max Andrews and Mariana Canepa Luna/ Latitudes Curatorial Office, Barcelona.
'Copper', a geology walk with landscape architect Jerry de Gryse, Queenstown, lutruwita/Tasmania. For 'Copper. Copper. Mudstone. Lead Sulphide. Shale.', a live event by A Published Event for The Unconformity 2018.
Margaret Woodward, author of Crocoite (2017) and Jane Rendell, author of Silver (2017), prepare to enter a mine adit at Dundas, Tasmania.
Copper (2020) by artist Catherine Evans. Image © Catherine Evans 2021. Reproduction by permission only.
F5010 Collenia brookmani. Found 6 iles East of Mt. Brockman, W. Pilbara. As published on page 66 of 'Fossil' (2019) by Perdita Phillips for Lost Rocks (2017–21).
A.P.E.

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‘Lost Rocks (2017–21)’ is an ambitious,
slow-publishing artwork – a library of forty two books,
by forty three artists over five years. A unique
seam of mineralogical and metaphysical
telling unfolds.

  1. 44. Seam X bundle (six titles) by multiple artists
    1. Bauxide by Dominique Chen & Tom Blake
    2. Fossil by Siddharth Pandey
    3. Fossil by Polly Stanton
    4. Granite by Katie Stackhouse
    5. Red Sandstone by Sofie Burgoyne
    6. Mudstone by Chris Henschke
    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2021
    • $90
  2. 43. Zinc Ore by A Published Event
    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2021
    • $20
    (Forthcoming)
  3. 42. Bauxide by Dominique Chen & Tom Blake
  4. Rhubarb by the river makes the aluminium of a pan available for the body.
    And turns the water orange.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2021
    • $20
  5. 41. Fossil by Siddharth Pandey
    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2021
    • $20
  6. 40. Fossil by Polly Stanton
  7. The strangeness of the weather is what intrigued me that day. The way it made the country shift and groan in one heaving moment as though nothing was separate.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2021
    • $20
  8. 39. Granite by Katie Stackhouse
  9. I imagine the weight of that rocky Pnyx Hill where western democracy was founded.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2021
    • $20
  10. 38. Red Sandstone by Sofie Burgoyne
  11. You become I, they become you, we all begin to mutate. The spill and contamination of aura begins to spread. I feel myself leaking, dripping outwards of myself, spreading across distance and mixing with an other. I feel panic. Can I dissolve?

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2021
    • $20
  12. 37. Mudstone by Chris Henschke
  13. As he stepped into the volcano of Mount Etna, it has been written that the Pre-Socratic philosopher Empedocles spoke thus: ‘Turn thee to the elements’.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2021
    • $20
  14. 36. Copper by Loren Kronemyer
  15. To go shallower, turn to page 21. To return to the present, turn to page 23.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2021
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  16. 35. Silver by Jen Bervin
  17. July 17 Dreaming of the library, the fennel, the stars, the shortcuts, the steepness, a post office box, one good café, javelina, accordian, walks.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2021
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  18. 34. Fossil by Ilana Halperin
  19. And now, in some ways, we are part of an international conglomerate, intrinsically bound together by the virus. Invisible glue, holding everyone together in a shared catastrophe.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2021
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  20. 33. Fossil by Erica Van Horn
  21. When the rubble got moved down to this spot, and I found the green pieces from her kitchen, or from a room that was not her kitchen, it was as if I was greeting her again. Then the woodcutters took all of that away.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2021
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  22. 32. Fossil by Robin Banks
  23. Countless days of childhood spent searching, hunting for that elusive critter, that unfamiliar plant, hidden from light and air, hidden from my inquisitive gaze, revealed with the hammer crack of a rock breaking open. What wonder is this?

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2021
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  24. 31. Granite by Nancy Kuhl
  25. Stories about Granite / One story is time beyond / comprehension. The end. // There is something called / a melt; it has a plot: beginning, // middle, and the last of it. / And the fever when it forms. // Solid parentrock and / percolation along margins. // See how it takes a shine. / The end, the end, the end.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2021
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  26. 30. Granite by Helena Demczuk
  27. It was Elena who started the conversation. ‘I use зелений, червонийй and синій for my portraits.’ I wasn’t sure I had heard correctly but she repeated it. ‘Green, red and blue to make skin tones.’

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2020
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  28. 29. Red Sandstone by Caroline Leowen
  29. If one could learn to read the distinctive handwriting etched into each stone, and the sometimes-illegible messages scrawled into its very structure, one might start to understand the history of deep time.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2020
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  30. 28. Copper by Catherine Evans
  31. But there was no implosion. The opposite happened; the hospital partially exploded and before we understood what was happening, great plumes of water rose up towards the sky as the shrapnel arched towards us. Great parts of the hospital flew at high speed towards the crowd in a silent theatre of gravity and mass and the unharnessed possibilities of matter.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2020
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  32. 27. Sandstone by Bianca Hester
  33. Millions of years of evolution buried deep within the double helix of my body’s biologic fabric were on display during those few raucous hours. Rock enveloped in reptile embedded in mammal. Moan.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2020
    • $20
  34. 26. Granite by Lyndal Jones
  35. It’s the hardness that holds no moisture. It’s the completeness, the stillness that has no give — no reflection of the other … In this case at least it’s not even a coldness. That would imply disdain.

    No. These are the eyes of someone who does not love, nor even care. These are the eyes, as I remember them, as I looked up as a small child, into the face of my grandmother.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2020
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  36. 25. Stalactite by Tricky Walsh
  37. These things leach through the unconscious one drip at a time.
    A tube of copper, a tin of coffee, a pair of broken wheels. Timber, always timber and string.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2020
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  38. 24. Fossil by Perdita Phillips
  39. This is not a jellyfish.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2019
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  40. 23. Granite by Shevaun Cooley
  41. What comes
    next: the long descent.
    To let our tired bodies down,
    over rock that has weathered
    us, under the swift mallet
    of light that grinds us
    to the ground.
    Beloved this world
    isn’t even ours.
    And it is also,
    profoundly, ours.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2019
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  42. 22. Marble by Louisa King & Jo Paterson Kinniburgh
  43. It was an industry that spawned respectable businessmen in the Australian cities, whose names still designate streets and suburbs: men who made their start on the islands off Tasmania.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2019
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  44. 21. Granite by Ruth Hadlow
  45. Each day I sit on the slab of granite, estrange myself from the surrounding world, to find and spend time with you.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2019
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  46. 20. Fossil by Wendy Morrow
  47. To go underground –
    Penetralia; the innermost secret parts and recesses; to go within, between rock and body, mysteries and doubt. A place of stillness – the black quiet world of fossil.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2019
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  48. 19. Rhyolite by Lucy Bleach
  49. As the route gains altitude, the integrity of the road’s surface diminishes; cracks reveal substrate, edges soften into the landscape and the village dissolves into a relaxed form of agriculture, then a feral fusion of native plants and weeds. The ascent becomes so acute that the Ape struggles to maintain its speed and, suddenly spent, spontaneously gives up, making a sound similar to a baby releasing a slow-motion raspberry from its wet lips.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2019
    • $20
  50. 18. Mudstone by Trygve Luktvasslimo
  51. There was a whiff of petroleum in the air. He turned and was faced with the towering sight of a cruise ship’s front hull. There was a dead body hanging by one leg from a rope that was attached to the anchor opening, and immediately to the right, in huge capital letters, was written THE WORLD.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2019
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  52. 17. Copper by Jerry de Gryse
  53. I find myself asking how does an ‘age’ begin? How does someone living 10,000 years ago ‘discover’ copper and start a period of weaponry, artistry and utility unlike that seen )or imagined) previously?

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2018
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  54. 16. Copper by Raymond Arnold
  55. A small clear tannin stream continuously flows around and below the shelf and provides a constant and pure source of water. Apart from the very occasional appearance of large birds of prey there is little sign of other fauna.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2018
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  56. 15. Bleisulfid by Tine Melzer & Markus Kummer
  57. Der Halt trügt, wenn auch die Versicherung dafür wirbt.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • German

    • Edition of 300
    • 2018
    • $20
  58. 14. Lead Sulphide by Tine Melzer & Markus Kummer
  59. The sense of stability is deceptive, if even insurance advertises it

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2018
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  60. 13. Shale by Julie Gough
  61. Shale compresses and covers, yet can erupt and crack and split and reveal what it has held firm, and shows that everything is interconnected, cause and effect. In this sense shale is Tasmania. Layer upon layer. A dark confusion.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2018
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  62. 12. Mudstone by Rory Wray-McCann
  63. I commence this roll in the mud account, that sets out to loosely predicate and prevaricate, on the little known shiny pleasures that are sometime observed, in the most boring of all the clastic-ites and shytes … the much maligned and ill-forgot mudstones.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2018
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  64. 11. Petrified Wood by Therese Keogh
  65. As the log lay motionless, the activity of the past 24 hours was replayed in inertia. The tool marks, falling into the tree from thrown shoulders and a chunk of rock, were suddenly rigid, rehashing each moment in stillness.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2018
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  66. 10. Petrified Wood by Mary Scott
  67. I, like you, am curious about nature, drawn to its vivid forms, its minutiae and exquisite variation. I see the world more deeply than many and know that when we are sensitive to the breaking waves of sunlight, the force of agitated water or the warm steamy air rising from the forest floor, our consciousness sharpens and bites like a knife
    upon a stone.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2018
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  68. 09. Fossil by James Newitt
  69. Networks served and networks tested; or, networks ruptured and networks restricted; or, networks cut and networks cut. Some can’t take the waiting, or the food, or the lights, or the bodies, or the families, or the conversations, or the dead flowers, or the smells, or the tea … and OK, I guess.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2018
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  70. 08. Crystal Bone by Greg Lehman
  71. Only one seal remains with her on the rock. Unlike the dark forms that have returned to the sea, her companion is silvery white, and has fixed her in a wide-eyed, liquid gaze. She waits for a movement, when she knows that she must quickly strike. But when the movement comes it is her that draws back.

      (Listen)
      Crystal Bone by Greg Lehman ×
    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2017
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  72. 07. Marble by Ally Bisshop
  73. This is how we move. We break one world to make another. And the remnants of the first world are always passaged, transformed, traced into the new one.

      (Listen)
      Marble by Ally Bisshop ×
    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2017
    • $20
    • (Preview)
  74. 06. Conglomerate by Ben Walter
  75. They had pressed through the early discomfort of their slack suburban muscles into true track hardiness, lean and strong, but had then stepped further into a new phase: vicious cramps, the sweat dissolving their joints. The slow, patient wear and tear needling away and sewing them a suit of weariness and strain that covered their whole bodies.

      (Listen)
      Conglomerate by Ben Walter ×
    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2017
    • $20
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  76. 05. Basalt by Ross Gibson
  77. In teeming numbers the eels move through this vibrant world of water. Arriving during the rainy season when the remnant-lakes swell and the volcanic plain swells like a colander in a tub, the eels leave the salt water, summoned to the freshwater by a baffling endocrinal change that compels them landward to furlough as another kind of fish for a while.

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2017
    • $20
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  78. 04. Silver/Lead by Sarah Jones
  79. I am digging a hole. I had thought that the hole would be around a metre deep, but already, at thirty centimetres, the ground is harder than I’d planned. I had planned (plans for the Earth?) that the Earth would submit to this unannounced displacement. Looking into the poor excuse that is the beginnings of my hole, I consider that the earth might have had other plans. The soft burn of frustration at dirt that will not heed my effort is rising in my cheeks. Two types of scarlet exertion flush my face. I’m probably also sunburnt; three. I stop digging. Hot from the inside and the outside, I throw the shovel down, the short unsatisfying thud it makes does nothing for what feels like an inherent specie-al inferiority. The dirt is too hard, the sun is too hot, I have no impact of the scale that …

    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2017
    • $20
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  80. 03. Silver by Jane Rendell
  81. A prospector, he was born on 7 October 1846 at Stuttgart, Duchy of Württemberg, where he was educated. A clerk in a chemical firm, he later trained as an edible-oil technologist with a large chemical manufacturing company in Hamburg, where he worked in the export department as he was fluent in English and French. He was delicate and the bitter winter of 1868 brought on a serious lung weakness, so he decided to leave Germany for a warmer climate. He arrived in Melbourne in 1869 and, on advice from friends, moved to New South Wales. He worked on Walwa station, then wandered from place to place until engaged as a boundary rider on Mount Gipps station in the Barrier Ranges in the far west. After discoveries of…

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      Silver by Jane Rendell ×
    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2017
    • $20
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  82. 02. Crocoite by Justy Phillips
  83. ‘We are all born with a hole in our hearts’. In the womb of our mothers, before we are breathing air, this hole acts as a kind of trapdoor that allows blood to bypass the lungs. In most cases this trapdoor closes itself during the first few days after birth. In rare cases, its hole remains open. This hole, you might come to know, as an ‘organism that persons’. A seam that grows-with. This is what happened to me. Medically, a hole in the heart or ‘patent foramen ovale’ can present in either the upper (atrial) or lower (ventricular) chambers of the heart, causing what is known as atrial and ventricular septal defects. These congenital heart ‘defects’ or rupturing malformations, enable blood to travel abnormally between the chambers of the heart. This diversion allows…

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      Crocoite by Justy Phillips ×
    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2017
    • $20
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  84. 01. Crocoite by Margaret Woodward
  85. When H saw the rock board in the local tip shop, she knew she had to have it. IGNEOUS, SEDIMENTARY, FOSSILS, METAMORPHIC and MINERALS, its 52 specimens displayed in five taxonomic groups, each labelled with red DYMO tape. These were the labels of a carefully arranged mineralogical landscape, the force fields of its specimens tamed and framed. With two gold coins she purchases the rock board, brings home this trophy of small losses and lives with it. She could not have known the hand that had brought these samples, these fragments, together but like so many others circulating the globe, this dispersed collection carries with it the zeal of a geological education – a portable landscape of Tasmania’s idiosyncratic terrain…

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      Crocoite by Margaret Woodward ×
    • 96pp, Softcover
    • 110×180mm
    • English

    • Edition of 300
    • 2017
    • $20
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